mediumaevum: Medieval houses are very rare in Paris. These two…



mediumaevum:

Medieval houses are very rare in Paris. These two on Rue François-Miron, are recorded in the early XVI century and could date, in their original state, from the XIV century. In 1607, an order was issued to cover the exposed wooden framework of the buildings with plaster in order to prevent fire hazards. The architect removed the wooden beams and then put them back according to the houses’ original design. (Image shows these buildings before and after renovations in 1960′s)

Another one can be found in Rue Volta.

Ah I posted a picture of this place a while ago but couldn’t remember where it was from, yay!!

thestandrewknot: Opéra Garnier, Paris.













thestandrewknot:

Opéra Garnier, Paris.

photoencounters: Château de Vaux-le-Vicomte. France. Photo by…



photoencounters:

Château de Vaux-le-Vicomte. France. Photo by Amber Maitrejean

convexly: untitled by Nicole da Rosa on Flickr.



convexly:

untitled by Nicole da Rosa on Flickr.

allthingseurope: Paris, Hôtel de Ville (by johanna.gyllsén)



allthingseurope:

Paris, Hôtel de Ville (by johanna.gyllsén)

me: yes i speak that language

me: yes i speak that language
me: no not that part

archimaps: On Rue de la Paix, Paris



archimaps:

On Rue de la Paix, Paris

lilyadoreparis: Paris…



lilyadoreparis:

Paris…

The Aeolian Project

This past semester my professor took us to Ferry Farm, the boyhood home of George Washington, to explore their archaeology lab. Quite a few weeks went by without thinking about Ferry Farm, and then it was time to sign up for spring classes, but I didn’t really find any classes that were calling to me. So my professor suggested I do an internship for class credit and why don’t I ask some of our really awesome local resources if they would be open to having an intern? So now Ferry Farm has reentered my life in a big way. After communications back and forth, I have ended up in an awesome, once in a life-time, internship opportunity. In my interview, I was asked if I knew anything about aeolian harps. My answer was maybe, but I can’t be sure I don’t know anything more than maybe hearing the name once before. So my immediate reaction is to ask Daddy, my instrument-maker guru, if he knows anything about them. He immediately does more research than I expected and probably the research I should have done after the harps came up in my interview. Somehow “hearing” about the harps has snowballed into us making one. Or more.

This is what we have so far, and by “we” I mean what daddy has mostly done, as I only joined in the project recently. The top is the right thickness, so today I helped thin the bottom down. I am sure there is a proper name for what we did, like “planing,” but I prefer to think of it as more like peeling the skin off of a carrot or potato.

FullSizeRender

Unfortunately, after I took the photo, while we were planing the bottom board it split in two. It split beautifully but couldn’t be used for the bottom or sides. So we have restarted with a slab of maple which is a bit tougher. The plan for the sides is to also be maple, barring any restarts. The top remains spruce.

So we’ll see what happens next!


bakchic: REC…#paris



bakchic:

REC…#paris

css.php